“The Good Fight” Book


The Good Fight: The Virtues and Value of the Martial Arts

Jeff Brooks is a unique and influential voice in the martial arts. His new book “The Good Fight” is Powerful – an unconventional look at the traditons, values, techniques and fundamental principles that give form and purpose to our martial arts. It looks at what it means to use martial arts to fight The Good Fight.

“The Good Fight” is Practical – with insights that are urgently needed – in our own lives, for the effectiveness of our training, and for the sake of the people in our lives who depend on us for strength, skill, and protection.

The Good Fight is Brilliant – it exposes toxic ideas that damage martial arts, and reveals surprising connections that make sense out of confusion, and make practice strong and good.

Every serious martial artist should read The Good Fight.

Author Jeff Brooks has the training and experience to back up every word he writes. As a violent crimes detective, as a law enforcement firearms and defensive tactics instructor… leading a dojo where he taught thousands of people… As a collaborator in research to restore defensive application and advanced movement in kata… Backed up by years of training and study, face to face with outstanding teachers and accomplished practitioners of combatives, religion, scholarship and philosophy… He has infused The Good Fight with his practical knowledge energy, clarity and purpose.

This is a rare and valuable resource for every martial artist practicing today – and to everyone serious about their life and their responsibility.

Reader Comments:
“No one writes about martial arts like this…” “Practical and inspiring, filled with wisdom and heart, this kind of instruction is rarely encountered. Enjoy it, use it, share it.”

“I love this…” “Very, very nice…” “You have given me so much to think about…” “The best explanation I have ever seen…” “Great… “I will share this…” “Fantastic.” “Thank you for writing  this…”

“The Good Fight”

Reader Comments:

“No one writes about martial arts like this…” “Practical and inspiring, filled with wisdom and heart, this kind of instruction is rarely encountered. Enjoy it, use it, share it.”

“I love this…” “Very, very nice…” “You have given me so much to think about…” “The best explanation I have ever seen…” “Great… “I will share this…” “Fantastic.” “Thank you for writing  this…”

“…There are exceptional people: Those that train their bodies, pushing it beyond normal limits, and in the process gaining the ability to exert power over others physically, literally moving them in keeping with their will. These we call fighters or warriors.

Still rarer are those that push themselves not only physically but mentally/spiritually. These rare individuals gain not only the ability to impose their wills on others physically, they gain the strength to exert influence over others emotionally, mentally, and spiritually.

Just as a well-trained person gains the capacity to fight on and on and endure pain, a spiritual warrior gains capacity of a different sort. Whereas a warrior exerts a physical influence on his surroundings, the spiritual warrior gains the additional capacity to influence their surroundings through the example that they set as loving, caring humans.

Jeff Brooks, my first karate sensei, is such a person: A man with unquestionable fighting abilities honed through physical training, but one also exerts a far more powerful and reaching influence on his surroundings by example.  This is, to me, what a “Sensei” is. Literally, the “One who is before us”

–Jeremy Blaustein, International Okinawan Goju-Ryu Federation, Himeji, Japan

 

“The Good Fight” …has a very practical application aspect that makes you want to take it with you and use it – and so you don’t want to miss anything so when you do it you will get it.  The good news is it works… I’ve taken pieces directly from the book, and applied them very specifically either to what I’m doing or what I’m teaching and it immediately becomes clear both to me and /or my students…. And this clarity lifts the understanding and puts energy into what we are doing because there is more “faith” in what is being taught because the “why” of it is more sharply in focus.

– Sensei Michael Lushington, Shorin Ryu, Castro Valley Karate

 

I love it.  MAN YOU CAN WRITE – Kyoshi Glenn Cunningham, Goju Ryu, Director of Security Tribeca Films

 

As a trial lawyer and martial artist I followed Jeff Brooks’ writing for 15 years, online and in print, before I met him. He was saying what a lot of us felt, asking questions a lot of us have, but never put into words.

My hope is this: everyone who studies with him, as I have, and everyone who reads his wonderful work, will appreciate their practice more than ever, and will deepen it for years to come. Read this book.

–  Sensei Dan Beck, Wadokai Aikido

 

To Order “The Good Fight” Paperback and Kindle Edition

 

Excerpts

 

From “Having a Practice”

…If we have a practice, pursue it whole-heartedly with our body and mind, refining our lives in its heat and pressure, we will become strong.

Then when we meet poisonous forces we can recognize them for what they are. We will not be tempted by them or deterred by them but will be able to act wisely and well.

A warrior on the battle field, a mother in child-birth, anyone who willingly offers their life so another can live, understands the urgency of being completely committed…

 

From “Hawk v Rabbit”

…We are not stuck with a role.  We are not by nature predator or prey. We do not need to be solitary and we need not be subsumed in a group or defined as a type.  We can act according to virtue any time under any circumstance. If it requires vigorous action we take it. If it requires patience and humility then that is what we do.  We are free to choose.  But only if we prepare. If we are untrained we are unfree…

 

From “Beginning Today”

…Go step by step. Bring your practice to life. Build your strength, skill, focus, speed and endurance. Build explosive power. Be awake. Be persistent. The secret is: There is no secret… 

 

From “A Precious Human Life”

…Peaceful people need protection. They get it. Once they feel safe the protectors are no longer welcome. They are a reminder of danger. They are a reminder that they rose to meet the threat when others did not. In times of peace they have no place. They make people feel uncomfortable. They are bad karma, people say…

 

Reader Feedback

A reader commented on this quotation from the 18th century allegory of the art of the sword called Neko no Myojutsu, The Cat’s Subtle Art, by Issai Chozanwhich appears on page 86 of “The Good Fight”: 

Question: “What is meant by ‘There is neither subject nor object’?”

Answer: …Because of the self, there is the enemy; when there is no self, there is no enemy.

This is an assertion that the opponent, or any object of mind, arises on the basis of the presumption of a self-existent “self” – is an echo of Dharmakirti in the Pramanavartika:

“Once there is a self, there is an idea of the other. On behalf of self and other there is attachment and hostility. All the faults come about in association with these.”

(See note 518 in Lam Rim Chen Mo vol. 1, and text on p300.)

Dharmakirti is associated with the Mind Only (Yogachara) school. This stream of inisight influenced Chinese Chan and Japanese Zen. The source text, the Pramanavartika is the fundamental text of Buddhist epistemology, and was taught widely to monks and scholars then and now.

(Dignanga, Dharmakirti’s predecessor at Nalanda in this stream of thought, lived and taught around the time of Bodhidharma.)

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